Persimmon Flowers Sashiko

ImageFinishing this sashiko project was like a deep sigh of relief.  Finally, I did it.

I bought this pre-printed pattern from Hobbyra Hobbyre last summer and have worked on it on-and-off since. This style of sashiko is called hitomezashi, or one-stitch sashiko. Hitomezashi is typically done on a grid with over-under stitches, each stitch and space equal in length and, if done neatly, is reversible. I know you think that is crazy talk, but I’ve seen it done and it is amazing. All you quilters and embroiderers out there know what I mean — typically the first thing I do when examining someone’s work is look at the back, right?! How do they hide all those ends? Well, I know how they do it; turns out I’m just lazy.

hitomezashi sashiko by Saké PuppetsNeedless to say, mine is not reversible. Hobbyra patterns (as well as Olympus) come printed on double-wide cotton, so you can fold and stitch through two layers or use the extra fabric to cover the ugly back when you are finished. This pattern is called kaki no hana, the flower of a persimmon.

This pre-printed pattern was a good introduction to hitomezashi, it just took me a long time to finish. I got bored and put it away, would pick it up again for a week or so, get bored, move on to something else …. you know how it goes. But now I’m so glad I saw it through.

* Update: want the pattern? Now you can find it here!

kaki no hana, persimmon flowers sashiko by Saké Puppets

22 thoughts on “Persimmon Flowers Sashiko

  1. It’s beautiful! I did a decorative one with sakura and other bits and pieces last winter – a preprinted Olympus one from Yuzaway. Was great to curl up on the sofa under the quilt at night. Still yet to do anything with it though, lol!

  2. Oh, that’s the same one that you sent to me that I have yet to finish. 🙂 It was a great relaxing project because the stitches are simple and I can watch TV while I’m working on it. I ought to get back to that one and finish it up; it would be a great thing to decorate my desk at work! Thanks for reminding me!

  3. Pingback: Hitomezashi sashiko: a tutorial | Saké Puppets

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